Real Estate Staging / Home Staging Blog

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Stepping on "accredited/certified” stager’s toes…

 I've said it before... staging talent is NOT just acquired by sitting in a weekend seminar or EVEN a week-long workshop. I have worked with people that have NO formal training and they have "it". 

Real Estate staging is having an eye for symmetry, balance, scale, proportion, and color. It is also a keen and innate talent for marketing and visual merchandising, as well as, having a sense of organization, cleanliness and flow. It is an understanding of sales demographics and how they can impact the "setting" of a property for sale in the market place.

I DO NOT think that what I described above is something one "certifiably" LEARNS in a weekend workshop.  I question what the industry is NOW calling "accredtied/certified" stager. WHERE is the test of one's TRUE understanding of EACH staging skill I describe above? 

If a Realtor must be tested, if a Mortgage Broker must be tested, and if a Home Inspector must be tested... then why not a Real Estate Stager?  If it is an "accredited" SKILL then let's do so, but not by paying $300 - $3000 and sitting for a long weekend in a hotel conference room.  LET'S accredit/certify stagers based on tested KNOWLEDGE and SKILL.

But if for now, one gets in touch with these skills, talents and passions by attending a seminar or workshop ... THEN it is money WELL SPENT.  But just because one has spent the money does NOT make them qualified or suited to do what it takes.  It only can make them aware to what is possible, but ultimately they need to have TALENT.

I am NOT being rude... I am passionate for providing the public with a service that ULTIMATELY benefits them. I do not want them "bamboozled' by amateurs.  It makes my job harder and more importantly ROBS sellers from what REALLY is possible when a professional is hired. It is NOT much different than the argument of what a WELL TRAINED professional Realtor has to offer when compared to a discount broker.

In my opinion (and that is ALL a blog is to be)... "Certified/Accredited" stagers shouldn't be so quick to defend their training... I believe one should be quicker to fight for and defend the benefits staging brings to a seller and make certain EVERYTHING in the industry protects those benefits. 

I am not better... I am just ahead of most (not all) other stagers. I learn more and more every day.

Craig

Comment balloon 23 commentsCraig Schiller • August 10 2006 06:24AM

Comments

Craig - You are so right!  It's about having a natural ability and then going with it.  That goes for photographers too.  I had a great virtual tour guy who really had a eye for what worked.  He sold his share of the business to his partner.  I only used him once because there was more street than house in his tour.  He could perform the job technically but the content was just not there.  Some things you just can't teach.
Posted by Donna Quanrud, Donna Quanrud Southwest Metro Homes (Coldwell Banker Burnet) about 14 years ago

Craig, it's not much different with real estate sales.  Most agents take a course of "x" hours, take a test and then after an additional test get licensed by the state.  They are then, more often than not, let loose on an unsuspecting public to sell their greatest asset.  The things I've heard newbies say over the years is astounding and often frightening.

It's a little like a physician, having fulfilled all his training being thrown into an operating room and told to do heart surgery.  It takes much more for all of us to be competent, let alone proficient at what we do.  As for talent, that's another story.  There are very few true artists out there.  That's why their work so excites us.

Posted by Geri Sonkin, Long Island Real Estate & Staging Expert (Douglas Elliman Real Estate 516-457-7103) about 14 years ago
Craig, training and education get you started but there is nothing like experience and true talent when it comes to some of the many facets of real estate.  That includes staging some people with or without training just have the gift.
Posted by Teri Isner, GRI, CRS, CIPS (Keller Williams Realty at the Lakes) about 14 years ago
As I've commented before, I think every designation should require evidence that the designee understands and competently applies the learning. ASR now requires testimonials from sellers who have used the agent.  A stagers designation or certification should require similar testimonials, and the stager should show before and afters.
Posted by Sharon Simms, St. Petersburg FL - CRS CIPS CLHMS RSPS (Coastal Properties Group International - Christie's International) about 14 years ago

Scott...

That is just my point... they are NOT licenses. A person can take the classes in medicine or law... but THAT does NOT license them to be a doctor or lawyer.  THEY MUST BE TESTED!

Same goes for Realtors, Mortgage Brokers, and Home Inspectors.

I am ALL FOR TRAINING... but these pseudo-certification/accreditations are NOT helping the industry grow and STANDARDIZE. To date I know of over 10 different staging certifying/accrediting agency's... is one better than the other? Do some train in areas others do not?

If sellers and realtors are hiring and DEPENDING on these people to help them prepare a property for market... then they better be good.  Just surf a few staging web sites and check out some of the work of some of these "accredited/certified" professionals... and look at the work they are holding up as professional staging. Some is outright laughable.

I will be the first to say that  MANY well qualified stagers have gone thru formal training... I don't deny that fact. But the certifying /accrediting should come from an IMPARTIAL 3rd party.

Posted by Craig Schiller about 14 years ago

Good Morning Craig,

Once upon a time Interior Designers weren`t licensed either today they have to be a member of the ASID.

Do you believe the same will hold true for staging?I believe this is exactly where this is heading..

Posted by Omar Camejo (Florida List For Less Realty,Inc.) about 14 years ago

GREAT EXAMPLE JOANN!!! (Why didn't I think of that? LOL)

Actually ASID is an impartial society that requires members meet a few acceptance standards: they must have a combination of accredited design education and/or full-time work experience and pass a two-day accreditation examination administered by the National Council for Interior Design Qualification (NCIDQ).

Interior Designers with ASID credentials after their names... have been trained outside of ASID. AND the NCIDQ exam is like what an accountant would have to take in order to be a CPA takes. AND IT IS TOUGHT! The National Council for Interior Design Qualification does not teach... it sets the standards and tests the standards... for the safety and well being of the public.

To be honest I am not sure just how to best structure Staging Accrediation... all I do know is that "credentialing" would tell a more truthful story if it were created, administered and monitored by an IMPARTIAL 3rd party.

If a person wants to boast that they were trained at a particular school/methodology... that is FINE with me. And that is really what these "credentials" that you now see are.  AND I do think that there are better schools training staging than others. Think Harvard vs. Lewis University... both schools have an accounting program.

But this alphabet soup of credentials that people are throwing around really MEANS NOTHING.  Let's put it this way... being a stager I could start teaching staging classes and after a person paid and sat thru my training I could give them a credential... like PSA - Professional Staging Associate. SOUNDS good but who the heck am I to define and determine what constitutes quality in an industry that operates in North America and Europe and beyond?

Thanks for taking the time to ask and listen...

Craig

Posted by Craig Schiller about 14 years ago

Angela,

Thanks so much for your comments. ONLY thru dialogue can our industry be expanded and new possibilities created!

Again, if you read ALL my blogs you will see that I have said over and over, that training is viable and worthwhile. 

But I now know of over 10 different accrediting/certifying staging organizations... so whose accreditation is right? Best? Wrong? Are they all as comprehensive as you organization? Is there nothing your organization can learn from another?

What is so wrong with there being ONE "national/international" code of standards that ALL accredited/certified stagers are trained for and adhere to?

How do we know your organization trains stagers entirely right? Of course YOU are going to think so (as I think I do)... but shouldn't there be common criteria that an entire industry defines and lives into? And might CSP offer something that other schools or stagers NEVER considered that would ultimately improve the ENTIRE industry.  As might the ASP, HSE, IRIS etc...

I am sure you are doing a fine job... but I bet you know that there are entities out there that are NOT.  There a schools that are more focused on cranking out "certified graduates" then legitimately training them to stage. THEY MADE THEIR BUCK SO WHO CARES! Until there are standards that ALL in the industry adhere to, then there will be charlatans that take advantage of the general public. Just because people have taken a training class does not make them GOOD at staging.

I said it before and I say it now, "Certified/Accredited" stagers shouldn't be so quick to defend their training."  If they are good, they are good... I believe NOW one should be quicker to fight for and defend the benefits staging brings to a seller and realtor and make certain EVERYTHING in the industry creates standards and protects benefits created from the standards. 

I am ULTIMATLEY fighting for the consumer!  I believe there should be ONE standard that EVERY professional stager must live into. Right now, it is mish-mosh... and confusing. And if a stager does a horrible job yet sells themselves as accredited/certified stager... then ultimately the ENTIRE legitimate industry will be diminished. 

What is wrong with what I am battling for?

Craig

Posted by Craig Schiller about 14 years ago

Caroline,

You can ALWAYS start by reading books on the subject... there are quite a few.  I don't have any favorites because they all say about the same thing in a slightly different way.

Of course trainging is an OPTION... but is it necessarry for everyone.  NOT if you have the natural talent... and can read. REMEMBER all the folks that now teach/write were once like you... green.

Drop me an email at craig.schiller@concinnitycorp.com and I will send you a few more thoughts.

Posted by Craig Schiller about 14 years ago

Lori,

First THANK YOU for your comments... my hope and purpose in blogging is to create active dialogue that I think it is important as this industry grows. And you are SOOO right... ignorance is bliss.  My ignorance/naiveté gives me a vantage point to ask the questions I ask, and to swim up stream when I think I need to.

But I am honored that you took the time to comment.  I am well aware of you and your organization.  Without a doubt, your years of experience and devotion to this industry have given you your own unique and rich appreciation, understanding and knowledge of this industry. If you go back and read all my blogs on Active Rain you will see a common thread... FIRST they are JUST my opinions.  I look at EVERYTHING I SEE occurring in the industry, not just one just ONE trainer site or ONE stager site, and filter it through my own experiences, and then I comment.

In fact, I own and have read your book!  (And some of your newspapers article too.) In my opinion it is one of the best I have found. Other books have been recently published... and I wonder why. 

It is funny that you commented on my blog... mainly because just a few Saturday's back I was thinking about you and your site and your book.  I actually tried to Google your name to see if I could find you to talk to you... but then chickened out. (I thought that you would think I was a staging stalker... kinda like what you eluded too in you blog comment.) Of all the people I know out there pushing themselves forward as "THE" expert... I think YOU should be too.  Your book realistically provides the reader more practical hands-on information than any others.  It is organized, helpful, and beautiful.  Your book is NOT about you trying to be a star... it is about useful staging advice.  It left me with a "good first impression" of you and what you do... and good first impressions are what this industry is all about (which I think people forget too quickly).

As for accrediting, I agree with you about the ASID and NAR... tons of politics and not perfect.  BUT my point is that ASID & NAR grants their certification to professionals schooled and trained OUTSIDE their organizations.  My concern regarding all these staging acronyms is for the consumer... if anyone can go out and create "accredited/certified" stagers, are they getting a standardized and quality degree of service? Ultimately if a consumer hires a QSP (fictitious acronym for: Quality Staging Professional) thinking they are getting a truly certified and accredited stager and that QSP falls short in the service they do.... does that not hurt the ENTIRE industry and for those who are in the industry legitimately teaching and training? To date I count over 20 different accrediting organizations.  Which are good? Bad?  

I think training is valuable.  I am not certain it is as comprehensive and complete as it needs to be.  Teaching a person to be a stager is one thing. Teaching them to create a business to deliver staging is a whole other thing. But, again as I said in the blog you commented on, "if for now, one gets in touch with these skills, talents and passions by attending a seminar or workshop ... THEN it is money WELL SPENT. Certified/Accredited stagers shouldn't be so quick to defend their (particular) training... I believe one should be quicker to fight for and defend the benefits staging brings to a seller and make certain EVERYTHING in the industry protects those benefits (for the consumers sake)."   

Yes, compared to you I am a newbie... but God I have staged a lot of homes.  I have a unique and diverse skill set (both personal and professional) that I draw upon daily.  When I started there was not a lot of staging occurring in Chicago, so I know a little of the uphill battle you speak of.  Many people thought (actually they still do think when I first tell them what we do), I invented staging. I will be the first to proudly admit I DID NOT create the idea.  I have, however, definitely put my own unique spin on what we do here at Real Estaging.  But the original concept is not mine.

My main purpose of my blog is to raise questions and raise the bar of professionalism.  I am amazed that in just over a month's time of my blogging that I have been contacted by other "trained certified/accredited" stagers and realtors who agree with what I say. This is not to say they agree with EVERYTHING I SAY... but some of what I say.  And that is good... it is creating and opening dialogue. (In fact that is the whole PURPOSE of Active Rain.)

If you don't ask questions and don't challenge the status quo, then how does one grow?  I am however in a unique position... I am successful and unaffiliated with any professional staging organization. So I "ignorantly" ask the questions that I do.

I do not want to or ever plan on creating a staging training school or my own personal accrediting body.  I DO plan on doing absolutely everything I can to make sure the consumer and realtor understands the industry and can therefore make the best educated decision they can. The cream will rise to the top.

Again, thank you for taking the time to write.  I SINCERELY appreciate your comments.

Craig

 

Posted by Craig Schiller about 14 years ago

Lori,

I look at it from this perspective... as in staging, visualizing possibility IS part of working on the final solution we offer our clients. If when meeting home sellers we couldn't visualize what was possibly for their property and said "forget it, this is a lost cause, there is no hope that staging can help", then where would we be? So I know that visualizing possibility is the beginning of the final solution to creating standardized accreditation/credentialing in the staging industry.

As of today I have only been blogging on Active Rain for 1 month and 4 days.  NOT a long time.  And to have someone of your caliber in the industry react and respond to my words does move the conversation forward. 

Words are a powerful.  While I know that War is quite often started with words... PEACE is always declared with words.  So I believe words/dialogue are a starting point.

While creating awareness of the NEED is a small beginning, please know that I have been working on a bigger constructive solution... around a SUPER busy schedule. 

My one voice can be come two, and two become three, and three...

Craig

Posted by Craig Schiller about 14 years ago

Certified/Accredited? Who cares? I don't. But some do.  I'll admit to having a need to sit in a classroom and learn some basics and I think that some people need to know that I sat in a classroom. Most, though, would be very impressed with a nice portfolio or websites.

Posted by Vickie Nagy, Vickie Jean the Palm Springs Condo Queen (Coldwell Banker Residential Real Estate) about 14 years ago

Craig, et. al.,

It's interesting that those without formal training and a resource for ongoing education criticize or minimize those that have taken the time, made the investment to learn properly what Home Staging is, and conduct a business professionally with a Code of Ethics and accountability to someone or an entity other than themselves.  To say you are "ahead" of most Stagers is quite a statement.

Stagedhomes.com is the Home Staging industry leader and was started by the woman who created Home Staging over 34 years ago - Barb Schwarz.  She has been recognized by the media and real estate industry as the one who created it all - and who continues to lead the way for this important industry.  The Accredited Staging Professional Course is the benchmark of excellence and training in the industry, with a Code of Ethics, and continual follow-up for adherance to professional policies designed to help make the industry better and stronger.

What most people miss, including some of those that have posted info on this blog, is that Staging is NOT part of the decorating industry . . . it is part of the Real Estate industry.  We are there to help the Sellers and help Realtors get a house sold.  It is a mindshift that most people miss and it's exciting to see the proverbial light bulb go on when they realize they had it all wrong - I see it all the time in the classes I teach for Stagedhomes.com.

Accredited Staging Professionals (ASP) learn in a classroom setting, have a supervised hands-on application of their skills, and then apply their knowledge in a business that has ongoing education and support through the online Staging University. 

Most Stagers have a God-given talent - what they lack is the ability to structure a business, have ongoing support and resources, and mentoring. They need knowledge of what Staging is - and what it is not - and the ability to wrap that around a business.  With Stagedhomes.com and the International Association of Home Staging Professionals (IAHSP) a person with talent in Staging can succeed.  Boasting over 7000 graduates and receiving over 5.5 million hits a month on the website, Stagedhomes.com leads the way - because of all it offers.  It is a resource to the public for locating qualified, trained Home Stagers, education about why Home Staging is a crucial part of selling a house, to education for those interested in starting a business, and for REALTORS that want to include Staging as a key marketing tool.

Stagedhomes.com was the first program in the US AND CANADA and remains the industry leader.  For over six years they have offered courses that are approved by many departments of real esate that understand the value of incorporating a quality course that offers beneficial information crucial to the real estate sales process.

Other people have started businesses patterned after the success of Stagedhomes.com - and the good news about them is that training is out there and is needed.  It is the same as any industry where training does matter - you choose one - when someone can stand up and say they have invested time to be properly educated, they stand out above someone with no training - even if that person has "natural talent."  As someone who has personally Staged over 1000 homes in a little over 4 years, my designation means something not only to me - but to my many satisfied clients.  And to the thousands of ASP graduates throughout the world, it means something.  It gives credibility, but more than that, our ASP designation actually has follow-up ongoing education in the form of the massive online Staging University, educational forums, annual conventions. monthly conference calls, newsletters, monthly local ASP Chapter meetings, and more. THAT is worth a lot - and our success in the industry tells more about why it's important to have a designation, accreditation, or certification than not.  It matters to those we serve - and isn't that what this is supposed to be about?  Helping others succeed in selling a home - and move on with their future - whatever that is?  Thanks for the opportunity to add some other food for thought on this vitally important topic.

Posted by Anonymous almost 14 years ago

Dear Commenter (Directly Above),

While I was a bit disappointed you felt you needed post your comment Anonymously... I do appluad you for what you share.

You are one of the FIRST ASP stagers I have come across who is willing to see the staging industry as being MORE than just Stagedhomes.com and its graduates.

You have gave me a lot to respond do... which I did in a separate blog that you can find here.

THANKS

Posted by Craig Schiller almost 14 years ago

Craig,

I applaude you on bringing this up as well.  If you will recall, it was exactly this question that I emailed you on, not too long ago.

I must say, it is a thick soup that we must wade through to find the right program in this field.  Coming from a design background, we all know that association w/ ASID or IIDA or any other group is not what makes or breaks you-and at least in this area, they don't mean a whole heck of a lot any more.

Talent is talent is talent.  Licensing in the design field is meant to protect the health and welfare of the public-not necessary (hopefully!) in the staging industry.  Should there be a governing set of standards?  Maybe.  However creating an entity that does not use itself to it's own personal advantage and instead does it for the greater good is easier said than done.  Can we say non-profit?

The sad thing is, I have met more than a few 'QSP' (fict.) graduates who think that clearing clutter IS enough.  It is not, and yes, if I were to take a course, I would expect it to hopefully include some semblance of a marketing/business plan.  The issue is, when you charge what many of them charge, and then see 'graduates' walk out with little to no usable skills, it gives serious pause to what they are offering. 

It is also a real shame when affiliates in other industries are given bad information by these 3-letter groups.  Just yesterday I was told that one cannot use the term 'staging' or call oneself a 'stager' unless affiliated w/ these groups.  It is not a federal regulation, and this spread of misformation (intentional or not) creates unneccesary tension between professionals that does not contribute to the productivity of this industry.

Sometimes I think an entrance exam would be beneficial-be it in design or in staging.  I've long felt that there are certain things that should come naturally, and if you are lacking (or frankly have no common sense or taste!), you don't get to come thru the golden gates! 

Just a thought from a not-so-drive-by.....

Posted by Cassandra B. almost 14 years ago

The bottom line on "accreditation".  Accreditation can only be issued by an organization that "accredits" many institutions.

WHO ARE THE ACCREDITORS? (the council for Higher education Accreditation states:

In the U.S., the accreditors are private, nongovernmental organizations created for the specific purpose of reviewing higher education institutions and programs for quality. In most other countries, accreditation (or quality assurance) is carried out by government organizations.

To find a recognized U.S. accrediting organization or a quality assurance organization in another country, visit the CHEA International Database. This database contains information about quality assurance and accreditation organizations from 48 countries, including the U.S.  Information about contacting each organization is included.

 Basically this means that ONE organizationcan "accredit" another group or schools as having met certain pre-determined standards to be deemed accredited. Staging is not a regulated industry and has NO governing board, standards or authority.  Any courses with the word "accredited in it" is simply the name of the course. A company can not "accredit" itself. 

Certification: transitive verb to declare that somebody or something has passed a test or achieved a certain standard

Staging courses can "certify" someone if they have a test. Kind of like the Microsoft Certification.

and Cassandra, I know alot of people say that the term stage or staging is trademarked and you can't use the term unless you have been trained by a particular company. This is NOT True. The term Stage DOES hold a Trademark on it for the creation and use of producing video tapes on training homeowners how to prepare their homes for sale. it is a Class 9 category in the US TradeMark office. ANYONE can use the term Stage, staging, stager, staged etc. Hope that clears it up.

Posted by Shell Brodnax, CEO- RESA (Real Estate Staging Association) over 13 years ago

In the medical field you have MD's, DO's, Chiropractors, Accupuncturists, Herbalists and so on.  None of them believe the other is worth a damn because they chose to get training in a certain field.  Yet, they are all in the medical field for the same reason -- to promote good health.  I could care less where people get Staging training, as long as they GET training somewhere.  Lets face it kids, everyone teaching staging copies everyone else in many ways, so we all end up with the same information, no matter how round about it gets to us.  IMHO, that is why training is important.

As for what was mentioned above, when I started practicing law as a paralegal in 1988, there were no universities that offered paralegal degrees,  you had to attend a very expensive business school.  Nobody knew what a paralegal was back then.  Now, to even be considered for a paralegal job you have to have a 4-year degree in Paralegal Studies from a university.  So -- experience counts yes.  But there are people out there who want to see that education, that proof that you took the extra steps and arent winging it so to speak.   Would you go to a doctor whose name was John Smith, but with no MD or whatever after it to show what KIND of doctor they are?  Not likely.  But thats just me.  I know many of my clients ask me about my training because they have heard of ASP's.  Do I wave the ASP FOREVER flag?  Heck no.  They gave me what I needed to get started and are now a distant memory.  Have I investigated other classes to see how they can enrich my knowledge?  You bet!  Knowledge is power.

Stage on my friends - the busy season is just beginning!

Posted by Karen Reynolds (Champagne Staging. LLC) over 13 years ago

You bet and I totally agree Knowledge is power.  I think the very successful people in every profession are the ones that continue to learn and grow.  Seeking further education is critical in a profession in order to keep your "tools" sharpened.  By learning more you grow with the industry and are not left behind in the times. Hey, there is a designation a new association can offer.  The "association" could accept applications from the staging industry to assign continuing education credits for mini-work shops, courses, etc. The association assigns a credit like 5 cont. ed credits.  The association creates a designation that requires X amount of Credits to receive. This is a way to offer a designation that is earned by taking more classes or workshops, seminars etc.  this is something everyone can work towards. I used to get a course approved for Cont. Ed Credits for Realtors. I know how all the states work and the system in general, so providers can develop cont. ed classes and they can use their current classes for credits and stagers can take more than one training and earn a designation.

We could call it exactly what you said Karen, Knowledge is Power the KIP designation and its fitting because it represents more education.  Shell  I think I am going to cross post this in the association blog.

Posted by Shell Brodnax, CEO- RESA (Real Estate Staging Association) over 13 years ago

Whoa, I just happened upon this one...I believe what both Karen Reynolds and Shell Brodnax have stated here.  Education is key to success and where one chooses to gain that knowledge I say go for it.  I took the ASP course in August  this one stood out for a variety of reasons. See for yourself at www.stagedhomes.com.  You are correct in that it was not cheap.  I already knew "how to stage" prior to taking the course.  However, I gained much more than an "accreditation" (which I believe gives one credibility in the real estate industry - this course also provides 16 MCE's to realtors -which make up more than 1/2 the class in some cases further building a stager's business thru networking and contacts)  I've been given the keys to a business that I am making what I want from it.  I also have a Bachelor's degree in Marketing, does that make me a better person than someone who does not have the degree - absolutely not. It makes me more knowledgeable in the marketing arena therefore having an edge over my competition.

There is no need to "step on toes" as mentioned in the blog.  That to me that looks like fear. In the vein of encouragement and support I've come to Active Rain to learn and grow, network and communicate to others the value and benefits of staging.  I would hope that no one would knock another down for having or not having "certification or accreditation" and that we all conduct ourselves with the highest ethical standards and do the best job possible.  However, continually educating ourselves in the growing staging profession is key to our success - weekend workshop or not!  But you are correct that no one wants to be taken advantage of by cut rate amatuers or those in it just for a quick buck.  I don't think people like that stand a chance of building a successful career in staging with that mentality and word does get around quick about who is reputable and who is not.

Happy Staging to All and to all a good day!

Posted by Karen Otto, Plano Home Staging, Dallas Home Staging, www.homes (Home Star Staging) over 13 years ago
Wonderful post, Craig....

I do have an ASP certification and honestly, I dont know any other staging certifications out there. But I still like to participate in this discussion in "general", mostly what is mentioned by other posters before me.

I agree with you about the "staging" skill is not acquired by a weekend seminar in a hotel room. It takes a process of lengthy experiences. Some have better perception than others. So, the number of years as an official stager is rather difficult to judge too.

I like that ultimately if the staging "bar" is raised, the consumer has the ultimate benefit.

The same goes to real estate licenses, even though we are "taught" a few classes, pass a couple of tests and off we become agents, there's not guarantee that we then become competent agents. So, I think having a "Standardized" accreditation is crucial but it can be a very daunting task.
Posted by Loreena and Michael Yeo, Real Estate Agents (3:16 team REALTY ~ Locally-owned Prosper TX Real Estate Co.) over 13 years ago

Hi Craig,

Let me first state that I truly do enjoy your website and blog forum.  A lot of information is shared here and it is all very informative. 

I understand that this topic of 'accredidation' in the staging industry is confusing and lot's of people have different views and experiences on this topic.  Some people say that there is no such thing as an accreditation in the staging industry, and some say something different. 

I agree with your point of view in a lot of ways and I think that it also needs to be made clear to the 'newbies' who are thinking about choosing training, that in order to receive accreditation it needs to come from an accredited program or school that is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

I am a 'newbie' who is interested in starting a home staging business.  So of course I am going to start my research on line. The first website that I went to start my 'research' was the ever so popular Stagedhomes.com by Barb Schwarz.  She offers that popular logo ASP (Accredited Staging Professional).  I myself (already in the design industry) questioned how she was able to offer accreditation.  So I sent her an e-mail and this was the response that I got back;

-The Staging Industry as a whole is NOT governed by any institution.
Anybody can start a Staging business. Barb named her course "Accredited
Staging Professional" because of her name recognition in the overall
industry. The word "Accredited" is not be confused with those courses
that are under the institutions you have mentioned below. Her course is
not approved under the U.S. Secretary of Education."  The ASP course is
designed to be a business module and created by someone who influences
the Home Staging industry and therefore is able to teach her students
how to be successful they same way she was. Hope this clarifies.

Ann Marie Hidalgo, ASP
ASP Course Marketing Specialist-

 

Maybe this post will help clear things up for the people who believe that accreditation actually exists in the staging industry.  Because compared to the above response I received, ASP is just the name of the course and not a legit accreditation. 

Posted by Anonymous about 12 years ago

Hi Craig,

Let me first state that I truly do enjoy your website and blog forum.  A lot of information is shared here and it is all very informative. 

I understand that this topic of 'accredidation' in the staging industry is confusing and lot's of people have different views and experiences on this topic.  Some people say that there is no such thing as an accreditation in the staging industry, and some say something different. 

I agree with your point of view in a lot of ways and I think that it also needs to be made clear to the 'newbies' who are thinking about choosing training, that in order to receive accreditation it needs to come from an accredited program or school that is recognized by the U.S. Department of Education.

I am a 'newbie' who is interested in starting a home staging business.  So of course I am going to start my research on line. The first website that I went to start my 'research' was the ever so popular Stagedhomes.com by Barb Schwarz.  She offers that popular logo ASP (Accredited Staging Professional).  I myself (already in the design industry) questioned how she was able to offer accreditation.  So I sent her an e-mail and this was the response that I got back;

-The Staging Industry as a whole is NOT governed by any institution.
Anybody can start a Staging business. Barb named her course "Accredited
Staging Professional" because of her name recognition in the overall
industry. The word "Accredited" is not be confused with those courses
that are under the institutions you have mentioned below. Her course is
not approved under the U.S. Secretary of Education."  The ASP course is
designed to be a business module and created by someone who influences
the Home Staging industry and therefore is able to teach her students
how to be successful they same way she was. Hope this clarifies.

Ann Marie Hidalgo, ASP
ASP Course Marketing Specialist-

 

Maybe this post will help clear things up for the people who believe that accreditation actually exists in the staging industry.  Because compared to the above response I received, ASP is just the name of the course and not a legit accreditation. 

Posted by Eliz B about 12 years ago

I have a question.

I'm a professional artist, and I wish to start a new business. Its an "art rental" program for Stagers.

I have no idea where to start or who to approach about this idea. I want to be informed before I step into this field.

Thank you in advance for your guidance,

Barbara Lemley

Posted by Barbara Lemley almost 11 years ago

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